Category Archives: Fine Arts

Meet NCJA #GameChanger of the Month: #Italian #Sculptor @ArtistLorenzo #NoCriticsJustArtists

About feature image: Hand of God by Lorenzo Quinn installed on Park Lane, Mayfair Iconic New Public Sculpture for London

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The ‘Pop’ Art Of… #Moroccan Master #Portraitist , Hassan Hajjaj #MoroccoArt #NoCriticsJustArtists #VisualArtist

Meet #SouthAfrican #VisualArtist , @MauriceMbikayi #NoCriticsJustArtists

Global Gallery Of The Month: #寶勝畫廊 ( X-Power #Gallery ) in #Taiwan #NoCriticsJustArtists

Meet The January ’17 Game Changer Of The Month; Painter, Archaeologist & Martial Artist – Ian Pettitt #NoCriticsJustArtists

 

Artist Update: On The Art Of… @AltusPajorArt ( #FineArtist of #Lincolnshire ) #NoCriticsJustArtists

Bob Marley by Altus Art
Bob Marley by Altus Art

Altus is a skilled artist capable of creating works in both contemporary and traditional styles.

Check Out NCJA Game Changer of the Month: #African #American #Sculptor, #Installation & #Performance #Artist , #DavidHammons #NoCriticsJustArtists

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David Hammons (born 1943) is a sculptor, installation and performance African American artist from Springfield IL in the 1960's
David Hammons (born 1943) is a sculptor, installation and performance African American artist from Springfield IL in the 1960’s

Hammons yaard – Bliz-aard Ball Sale (1983), a performance piece in which Hammons situates himself alongside street vendors in downtown Manhattan in order to sell snowballs which are priced according to size.

About feature image:                                                                                                           David Hammons, “How Ya Like Me Now?,” 1988 (Photo: John Kennard)

David Hammons’s 1988 billboard-sized portrait of Jesse Jackson, the African-American civil rights activist and 1984 and ’88 Democratic presidential candidate, turns him caucasian, blonde and blue-eyed. The title, “How Ya Like Me Now?” (from the title of Kool Moe Dee’s 1987 rap) is scrawled across the painting’s bottom—defiantly questioning how race colors people’s opinions.